Anav, Judah ben Benjamin

(fl. 13th cent)
   Roman author. In 1280 he completed a treatise on the laws of ritual slaughter with special reference to Roman customs.

Dictionary of Jewish Biography. .

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  • ANAV, JUDAH BEN BENJAMIN HA-ROFE — (13th century), author, copyist, and paytan; member of the anau family of Rome. He was also known as Judah Ya aleh (initial letters of Yehudah Anav le Mishpaḥat ha Anavim, an allusion to Judg. 1:2). Of his personal life, little is known. He… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • ANAV, JEHIEL BEN JEKUTHIEL BEN BENJAMIN HA-ROFE — (second half of 13th century), author, copyist, and paytan; a member of the Anau family of Rome. Little is known of his life. He was the author of a significant work, first published at Constantinople (1512) under the title of Beit Middot and… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • ELIEZER BEN SAMUEL OF METZ — (c. 1115–c. 1198), tosafist and halakhic authority. Eliezer was a pupil of jacob tam (see Sefer ha Yashar, ed. by F. Rosenthal (1898), 128 n. 57), as well as of samuel b. meir , and Ḥayyim Cohen of Paris. Among his disciples were some of the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • NATHAN BEN JEHIEL OF ROME — (1035–c. 1110), Italian lexicographer, also called Ba al he Arukh ( the author of the Arukh ) after the title of his lexicon. Few biographical details are known of him. Some state that he belonged to the de pomis or Delli Mansi family, but the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Tanya Rabbati — Note: Tanya, an important work of Hasidic Judaism, is an unrelated book with a similar name. For other uses, see Tanya (disambiguation). Tanya Rabbati is an anonymous work on Jewish law first published in Italy, in 1514 CE. Shibbolei ha Leket,… …   Wikipedia

  • ANAU — (Anav; Heb. מן הענוים), ancient Italian family. Most of its members lived in Rome, although some moved to other towns in Italy. According to family tradition, the Anaus were descended from one of four aristocratic families of Jerusalem whom Titus …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • ISTANBUL — ISTANBUL, city in N.W. turkey , on both sides of the Bosphorus at its entrance on the Sea of Marmara (for history prior to 1453, see constantinople ). Constantinople was taken from the Byzantine emperor in 1453 by the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • CODIFICATION OF LAW — This article is arranged according to the following outline: the concept and its prevalence in other legal systems in jewish law in the mishnah format and style of the mishnah the talmud and post talmudic halakhic literary forms variety of… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • PIYYUT — (Heb. פִּיּוּט; plural: piyyutim; from the Greek ποιητής), a lyrical composition intended to embellish an obligatory prayer or any other religious ceremony, communal or private. In a wider sense, piyyut is the totality of compositions composed in …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • LITERATURE, JEWISH — Literature on Jewish themes and in languages regarded as Jewish has been written continuously for the past 3,000 years. What the term Jewish literature encompasses, however, demands definition, since Jews have lived in so many countries and have… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

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